Pete Buttigieg Mocks Americans Using Gas Powered Cars

(FeaturedHeadlines.com) US Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg blasted Americans who continue to use gas-powered vehicles instead of newer electric models. In an interview on April 2, Buttigieg compared drivers of gas cars to people in the early 2000’s who thought they could “just have landline phones forever.”

The automotive industry is moving toward electric vehicles and the United States cannot pretend otherwise, Buttigieg said. The US must either lead the industry transformation or fall behind China, according to Buttigieg.

Although fossil fuels are still used to generate the power that charges electric vehicle batteries, it is a more efficient use of the energy sources than burning the fuel in car engines, Buttigieg said in the interview. The US can best support electric vehicles by making them more affordable through policies such as tax credits, Buttigieg said.

Elon Musk’s Tesla brand of electric vehicles is facing increased competition as other automotive manufacturers like Ford and General Motors enter the market, Buttigieg said.

Electric vehicles may be increasingly popular, but Buttigieg is not, according to a March 2024 poll. Forty percent (40%) of Americans have an unfavorable view of Buttigieg, including 30% who view him very unfavorably, the poll found. Buttigieg’s favorability has dropped since March 2023, the poll report said.

Whereas a majority of Democrats view Buttigieg favorably, only 18% of Republican and 38% of independent voters share that favorable view, according to the poll results. The poll maintains a margin of error of plus-or-minus three percentage points.

The poll, conducted from March 26-28, coincided with the government’s response to the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore on March 26. Buttigieg helped lead the Biden administration’s response to the incident, in which six people were killed. Buttigieg said that the federal government would apply findings of an investigation into the collapse to future regulatory and funding decisions.

After all, what good are electric or gas-powered vehicles if Americans are unsure whether it is safe to drive on the nation’s roads and bridges?

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